Water, Water Everywhere But Not a Drop to Spare

By: 
JOSEPH GRANT
Editor

Even though it is winter, in an agricultural region such as ours, we need to begin thinking of our water tables and how water affects our every day life here in West Texas. We use water to drink, grow food, to grow cotton, to bathe in and cook. In our modern society we can take such a thing as water for granted; that it will always be there when we turn on the tap.
All we have to do is to look to Flint, Michigan or Cape Town last year when it was running out of water to see how important water is to our existence. We assume it will always be there. When I lived in Los Angeles during an unseasonably warm summer of temperatures in the 110 degree mark for weeks on end, air conditioners sold as fast they were brought in to the stores. There were literally fights over something that is a luxury and not a necessity like water.
Water is a precious commodity in our neck of the woods and the more we conserve water, obviously the more we have. If we don’t conserve, we run the risk of not having enough water. We’ve seen the rivers and lakes run dry and down to dangerous levels over the past few years. Currently, we are blessed to have had the rains last year to fill our lakes and rivers. There is no better time to conserve water than now.
There are many interesting facts regarding water. Less than 2% of the Earth’s water supply is fresh water. Of all the earth’s water, 97% is salt water found in oceans and seas. Only 1 % of the earth’s water is available for drinking water. Two percent is frozen. The human body is about 75% water. A person can survive about a month without food, but only 5 to 7 days without water.
Every day in the United States, we drink about 110 million gallons of water. Landscaping accounts for about half the water Californians use at home. Showers account for another 18 percent, while toilets use about 20 percent. Showering and bathing are the largest indoor uses (27%) of water domestically. The average American uses 140-170 gallons of water per day.
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